Rabies alert

This is a great time to remind everyone to have their animals vaccinated for Rabies.  This should include livestock like horses.


The following is a news release from Arizona Department of Health Services.  If you see any wild animals acting out of the normal contact Arizona Game and Fish.


NEWS RELEASE For Immediate Release | Dec. 13, 2017

Media Contact | Nicole Capone

Mobile | 480.980.2940

Gray Fox Rabies Activity Has Quadrupled in Several Arizona Counties This Year

Public Urged to Take Precautions to Prevent Rabies Infections

PHOENIX – Rabies activity in Arizona’s gray fox populations has quadrupled in the last year according to data released by the Arizona Department of Health Services. As of a report today, there are 24 rabid foxes in 2017, compared with 6 rabid foxes reported statewide in 2016. Six of these cases were confirmed in the past two months.

An outbreak of fox rabies is occurring in the east-central part of Arizona near recreational hiking trails and camping areas in Maricopa and Pinal Counties, which includes the Superstition Mountains Wilderness Area. Several foxes have been seen alongside trailheads and there is evidence that the outbreak may be spreading to more urban areas posing additional risk to people and their pets living in residential communities. So far in 2017, rabid foxes have been identified in Cochise, Navajo, Pima, and Santa Cruz Counties and now recently in Gila, Maricopa, and Pinal Counties.

“It is very important for people to take precautions such as keeping their pets on a leash and vaccinated against rabies, which is a very serious disease that can be fatal,” said Dr. Cara Christ, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services. “People can still walk, hike, or camp in these areas, but should

be aware that rabid animals have been identified. It is important to make sure you and your pets are not

interacting with wild animals. When at home, pets should be supervised or kept in a fenced yard.”

Rabies is a virus spread by the bite of or contact with saliva of an infected animal. Rabies causes severe damage to the central nervous system and usually leads to death once symptoms appear. Human exposures to rabid animals are usually rare, but domestic animals, such as cats and dogs often come into contact with wild animals.

In Arizona, bats, skunks, and foxes are the main animal sources of rabies. The first sign of rabies is

usually a change in the animal’s behavior. Animals may act more aggressive or more tame than usual, be out during the day, stagger, tremble, or seem weak. Rabid animals may appear agitated and excited or paralyzed and frightened. Sometimes, rabid animals do not show any signs of illness before death from rabies.

ADHS advises that people do not touch, or feed wild or unfamiliar animals, even if they do not appear sick or aggressive. Any wild animal exhibiting erratic or aggressive behavior should be reported to local animal control officials or the Arizona Game and Fish Department at 602-942-3000. If you or your pet is bitten or has contact with a wild animal, seek immediate medical or veterinary attention and contact your county public health department.

For more information on rabies, go online to www.azhealth.gov/rabies.

Dangers of Raw Milk

The consumption of raw milk over the last few years has increased due to the feeling that it has many benefits from good bacteria over pasteurized milk and milk products.  Pasteurization while not changing the milk does kill bad  bacteria like Tuberculosis,  Brucellosis and Listeria which will make people sick.

Stay safe and feel free to share.

Dr. Mundschenk



Texas raw milk Brucella contamination hits 7 states

By Coral Beach

Food Safety News

September 15, 2017



Although it is against federal law to sell unpasteurized milk across state lines, the CDC and state health departments are investigating illnesses in at least seven states in relation to Brucella bacteria found in raw milk from a Texas dairy.

 One woman in Texas has been in the hospital for weeks with a lab-confirmed case of brucellosis. A sample from her matches antibiotic-resistant Brucella bacteria found in raw milk from K-Bar dairy in Paradise, TX, according to Texas officials and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 “It’s very important for people who drank raw milk from this dairy to seek treatment to prevent infection with Brucella RB51,” said Dr. William Bower who is leading the CDC’s brucellosis investigation group.

 “Even if people don’t have any symptoms now, they can develop a chronic infection that can impact their health for years to come.”

 Full text: http://tinyurl.com/yath4gfk



Southern AZ Rabies Update

Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors lifted the rabies quarantine back in this spring. Below is a link to a review (in map form) of positive cases over the last couple of years.

If you’re riding, hiking, or simply out wandering around, please be aware. Same goes for your livestock or pets in the area. Be aware of the risks and consider vaccination. Rabies isn’t one of those recommended learning experiences.

2015-07-20 Skunk Map Southern AZ 2013-15

Bug Borne Disease Update

A couple of points from a report AZ Dept Health Services released yesterday concerning what’s going on in 2015:

  • 34 mosquito pools have tested positive for West Nile virus; all positive pools were identified in Maricopa County
  • 13 confirmed or probable cases of Rocky Mountain Spotted-Fever (RMSF)
  • 14 suspect cases of RMSF

Keep those mosquitoes and ticks at bay!